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Al's Heat and Noise Reducer

#1
So comfort was never one of the things that mattered when rovers were initially designed. After 25 years, they came out with my model that was more "comfortable". They put syncros on all of the gears in the transmission (not just 1!!) and then put the gauges in front of the driver instead of on the other side of the dash facepalm

Couple this with the fact I got to try to most ridiculous and unknown stupid crap I can conjure, I decided to try some random crap to see what would happen. So I painted in Al's Heat and Noise reducer. It pretty much goes in like paint so if you are decent with that, then you are fine. I used a 3" roller for most of it once I had everything masked off like I wanted it. I think laid down many thick coats throughout the day. Overall I used half a gallon just on the cab floor of my truck.

Overall it has been pretty darn good. It did help quiet down the interior a lot, although it is still stupid loud. The biggest bonus was on the heat. My footwells would get really hot. Even in 96 degree heat, broad daylight, rolling 60-ish down the highway, the footwell wasn't hot at all and the panels were only warm to the touch vs. cooking temps. I'll need to add another layer of sound proofing (which I will do...one day) and heavy mats but this was a good first base layer that I don't have to worry about smelling, melting, getting destroyed, or anything else like that.

My only thing is I should have painted over the stuff. I just left it. It looks like crap and if I had at least attempted to paint match it, it would look a bit better.

Overall if you are stripping the interior of a vehicle or repainting a vehicle's interior, I see no reason not to throw down a heavy coat of this stuff first before the next coat. Especially in an older vehicle such as mine.
 
#2
So comfort was never one of the things that mattered when rovers were initially designed. After 25 years, they came out with my model that was more "comfortable". They put syncros on all of the gears in the transmission (not just 1!!) and then put the gauges in front of the driver instead of on the other side of the dash facepalm

Couple this with the fact I got to try to most ridiculous and unknown stupid crap I can conjure, I decided to try some random crap to see what would happen. So I painted in Al's Heat and Noise reducer. It pretty much goes in like paint so if you are decent with that, then you are fine. I used a 3" roller for most of it once I had everything masked off like I wanted it. I think laid down many thick coats throughout the day. Overall I used half a gallon just on the cab floor of my truck.

Overall it has been pretty darn good. It did help quiet down the interior a lot, although it is still stupid loud. The biggest bonus was on the heat. My footwells would get really hot. Even in 96 degree heat, broad daylight, rolling 60-ish down the highway, the footwell wasn't hot at all and the panels were only warm to the touch vs. cooking temps. I'll need to add another layer of sound proofing (which I will do...one day) and heavy mats but this was a good first base layer that I don't have to worry about smelling, melting, getting destroyed, or anything else like that.

My only thing is I should have painted over the stuff. I just left it. It looks like crap and if I had at least attempted to paint match it, it would look a bit better.

Overall if you are stripping the interior of a vehicle or repainting a vehicle's interior, I see no reason not to throw down a heavy coat of this stuff first before the next coat. Especially in an older vehicle such as mine.
what color is it?
 
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